Bookscoops

The Scoop on Children & Adolescent Literature

Archive for May, 2009

How I Became a Pirate by Melinda Long, Illustrated by David Shannon

Posted by bookscoops on May 22, 2009

howIbecameapirate

So, I (Holly here) was digging through a bunch of books at a store one recent day, and low and behold, shiver-me timbers, I found this great book, that my kids let me hold for about half a second. My two year old had me read the book for nap time, bed time and two times in the morning within 45 minutes of waking up. Then, he took it and hid under the table with it, slowly turning pages, studiously learning about pirates.

When I proposed the idea to Cari, she wasn’t so sure about it being a double scoop because of all the news about pirates recently. But, after the resounding approval of her daughter, we decided it would be the perfect opportunity to discuss one of the controversial aspects of children’s literature. Where do you draw the line between reality and imagination?

What captured your interest?

Holly: I like the illustration on the title page, because it obviously is a little boy pretending. Then you turn the page and you enter Jeremy Jacob’s imaginary world.

Cari: I really like that the pirates have green teeth, and the pirates sing a little off-key.

What was your favorite part?

Cari: I think one of my favorite parts is the part where Jeremy Jacobs talks about how carrots are not allowed on the ship and there is no Spinach anywhere on board. Not to mention you don’t have to use please and thank you.

Holly: My boys like the pirate with two eye patches and how he’s constantly flipping one patch up to see what’s going on.

Cari: I also like the captain’s name – Braid Beard.

What is your favorite illustration?

Holly: One of  my favorite pictures, is Jeremy Jacob trying to go to sleep in the middle of the pirates with a pirate squished next to him with his mouth wide open sharing his stinky green teeth breath and then a putrid pirate foot dangling in his face. The look on the kid’s face says, “I want my mom!”

Cari: Yeah and then Jeremy Jacob wonders why they don’t have anything to read on the ship.

Holly: All they have is maps. After that he doesn’t even bother asking for a good night kiss.

Cari: I like, on the page with the pillow fight, where Captain Braid Beard says pirates don’t have to wear pajamas ‘unless you want to’ and there is a pirate changing into pajamas in the background.

Holly: Yeah me too and the pirate is wearing sailboat pajamas, that would make so much sense to a little boy. You always have pajamas with pictures of what you love. I mean, don’t you?

What qualifies you to be a pirate in kid’s minds?

Cari: I like how quickly Jeremy Jacobs learns to speak ‘pirate’. He thinks that means he’s official.

Holly: The one skill the pirates are looking for is digging. I think it reveals that on a subconscious level Jeremy’s not sure about being a pirate, but he has this digging skill that might be useful to pirates, so he could maybe help them out for a while.

Cari: Jeremy Jacob doesn’t really get what pirates do completely, hmm now my daughter is hearing our conversation and wants to know what’s going on. She loved the book.

What did the pirates remind you of?

Holly: I love the illustrations, they are so vivid and fun and Braid Beard is so jolly looking that if he had a different jacket, white hair and teeth (not green) he could pass as a certain famous holiday character.

Cari: I really like the illustrations too! And I love the map to Jeremy Jacob’s Backyard where they ultimately decide to bury the treasure.

Holly: The map is a ‘treasure’ in and of itself.

Cari: I like also whenever the pirate captain says something they all repeat it back. Giving a sing-song feel to the story. And the map even has a compass rose.

Holly: Jeremy Jacob gives them the idea to bury the treasure in his yard while he’s standing next to the broken mast. Then when the pirates are sailing away after burying the treasure, the mast is suddenly intact. It gives a dream feel to the book where things are not always logical.

Holly: David Shannon must have had a lot of fun illustrating this book.

Cari: Oh I agree I think he is a lot of fun,

Holly: Don’t you know some interesting things about pirates, Cari?

Cari: I know of some Pirates from the pages of history that depending what ‘side’ you are on aren’t necessarily bad – Sir Francis Drake, for example. I think pirates can be a good thing sometimes. Children use imaginary play to make sense of the world around them. Recently pirates have been in the news lately and it has not been such a good thing.

Holly: So, maybe this book could help kids make some sense of what they hear on the news. I like that at the end you can see that this is a little boy who is on a pirate soccer team and he is trying to process how to be a good pirate so he can be a really good pirate soccer player.

Cari & Holly:  We both really feel for the families who are having to deal with pirates and missing/captured loved ones. How do you help your kids deal with things they hear about on the news or from friends?

And now for a trip down memory lane:

Holly: We once had pirates in our backyard. Cari saw them, didn’t you?

Cari: I don’t know if you could technically say I saw them.

Holly: What? Are you saying I’ve believed in a lie all these years?

Cari: Well, at age five when you find treasure in the sandbox it’s almost like seeing pirates.

Holly: We did find quite a treasure. I remember so clearly when we had just moved and were exploring our new backyard and, of course, digging in the sandbox . . .

Many, many years ago, we won’t divulge exactly how long:

Cari: Look Holly! Look! I found something.

Holly: What is it? What is it?(gasp)

Cari: A penny! It’s a penny!

Holly: Woah! Let’s see if there are any more.

(both glancing at the sun baked crusted sand)

Cari: We need some shovels.

Holly: We don’t have any. Remember you hid our shovels and pails in the field at our old house and they disappeared forever?

Cari: No I didn’t!

Holly: Yes you did.

Cari: Well, I hid them, but you were supposed to find them, so it’s your fault they’re lost.

Holly: I never wanted to play hide and seek with them! It’s your fault, so you go get something to use.

Cari: All right. I’ll go get some spoons from the drawer by the dishwasher. Mom won’t catch me I’m super sneaky.

(both resume digging with shiny silver spoons)

Holly: Look! I found a nickel!

Cari: I found a nickel and some pennies.

Holly: Wow! We’re going to be rich soon if we keep finding money. I wonder where it all came from?

Cari: Well, let’s think a minute. We are finding treasure in our sand box. Sand boxes are for digging up things that are buried. Buried treasure equals. . . Pirates!

Holly: Pirates?!?

Cari: Shh! Be quiet, you don’t want them to hear you. They might be coming back to dig up their treasure and if they know we got it first we might get captured!

Holly: I don’t want them to get my money.

Cari: It’s our money. Besides, we’re going to build a trap for them.

Holly: A trap? What kind of trap?

Cari: First, we need to dig a big hole in the ground. Like on Swiss Family Robinson.

Holly: We need bigger spoons.

Cari: That’s not all. We’re going to mix some quick sand and some poisonous bark and leaves with water at the bottom of our pit. Then, we’ll sprinkle  dry sand on top to disguise it.

Holly: Let’s get the boys to help. We can have them get the hose. That way we won’t get in trouble for turning on the water.

Working at a feverish pace all afternoon, the two foot deep  ‘Pit’ is finally finished.

Cari: (sprinkling a last handful of sand) Perfect!

Holly: Do you think we’ll catch a pirate tonight?

Cari: It might take a couple of days.

Holly: Should we try to sneak out and spy on the sand box tonight?

Cari: Only if you want to be captured by the pirates.

Holly: No, I don’t want to be captured, but how are we gunna know?

Cari: Oh, I will know if anyone messes up my, uh our pit.

That night:

Cari: (whispering) Holly, there’s someone outside our window. It’s a pirate, look!

Holly: (covers over head) No way, I’m not showing my face. Those pirates can take you.

Cari: Holly! Look! I see eyes right there! Ahhh! (covers now over both heads)

Cari: Go get Mom and Dad.

Holly: No way, I’m not moving. You go get them.

Cari: No, I’m too scared. I’m not moving either.

Holly: Baby.

Cari: You’re the baby.

Holly: No, you are.

Cari: You are.

Holly: You are.

Cari: (gasp!) He’s gone.

Holly: Whew! I was getting hot under those covers. Do you think he’ll come back?

Cari: Probably not, he was just checking to make sure we didn’t have the treasure in our room.

Holly: It’s a good thing we hid it real good.

Cari: Yeah. Go to sleep. I’m tired.

Holly: Okay. Good night.

Cari: Good night.

In the morning out at the sand box:

Holly: There’s nothing in the trap!

Cari: They must be smarter pirates than I thought. Let’s see if there’s any treasure left.

Holly: Okay, here’s your spoon. Let’s get to work!

Cari: Argh! Dig for treasure!

Holly: Aye Aye Captain! Dig for Treasure!

There is a second book out entitled Pirates Don’t Change Diapers (which Cari and her daughter think is a lot of fun too!)

Melinda Long’s website & blog.  For more information about David Shannon visit the Scholastic Books Author webpage.

Posted in Double Scoops, Picture Books | 5 Comments »

Bookscoops April 2009 Review (and yea, we realize it’s May 20th)

Posted by bookscoops on May 20, 2009

April was a busy month for us both. Cari found and applied for a literacy specialist ‘dream’ job.  Read the May review next month to find out how it turned out.  I (Holly here) left the country for the first time ever in my life to travel to the Dominican Republic with my great husband for our 10 year anniversary. We had a great time and came back appreciating clean drinking water and missing sugary-sweet fresh pineapple. While I was out of the country my husband and I took the time to visit an orphanage, one of many in the DR, and were able to pass along a few books in Spanish as well as some basketballs, a frisbee and some really loud fu-fu toys. We hope to help with some efforts to give these wonderful kids a hand up- so look for more information to come in the next few months.

Despite a wonderful week of relaxation and fun that theoretically should have carried over to make my life serene for at least two weeks after getting home, I returned to have my kids all get the stomach flu one after another for all of last week. So, now that we are back on our feet and I have a couple of nights of sleep under my belt- let’s get to the May uh, I mean April review.

Our Double Scoop this month is a great middle grade novel by one of our favorite authors, Richard Peck, called  A Year Down Yonder by Richard Peck.  If you want a great laugh and some good ideas for pranks this is the book for you!

Holly’s pick of the month: I picked two this month Greater Than Angels by Carol Matas (this was part of my reading for National Holocaust month) and On the Wings of Heroes by Richard Peck, also a WWII story.

Cari’s Pick of the Month – Hmm. . . since I only reviewed three books it should be easier right, wrong!!! I think I will go with Fablehaven by Brandon Mull.

Books reviewed by Holly

Books Reviewed by Cari

Books Reviewed for National Holocaust Month

Other Book related Posts

Book Scoops News

We had our first book give away with Janet Halfmann that ended April 7th. Yeah to our two winners, MJ and Lisa O.

We are also starting a list of books we have read and recommend, but have not reviewed because it seems we are in a constant state of trying to catch-up on all our reviewing and we probably won’t because we are strong believers in KISS (Keep It Simple Stupid!).

Well Cari is going to still try and finish out the Diversity Rocks Challenge!, but she missed it this month, look out for two review for this challenge to make up for April.

Blog Spotlights

A great resource for aspiring authors and illustrators is this wonderful blog by editor Chuck Sambuchino
Guide to Literary Agents, which offers priceless information about the book publishing industry.

Posted in News | 2 Comments »

The Woman in the Moon: A Story from Hawai´i Retold by Jama Kim Rattigan, Pictures by Carla Golembe

Posted by caribookscoops on May 18, 2009

thewomaninthemoon

I first saw this book feature in the fairytales/folktales section of our local library and immediately recognized the name – Jama Rattigan. I was pretty excited to see this book since I have visited Jama’s blog, alphabet soup. Both Holly and I enjoy reading her blog entries. She also wrote a book called Dumpling Soup, which I have not had a chance to check out yet, but hope to soon.

I was definitely intrigued by the idea of a book about the Woman in the Moon, I was familiar with the man in the moon, but this was new story to me. From the book,

On nights when the moon is round and full, some say that man lives in the moon. But in the islands of Hawai’i, where the gentle winds tell stories from ancient times, the children know that it is not a man in the moon. A woman lives there, and her name is Hina.

I just loved this tale about how Hina became the woman in the moon and about her tapa cloth making skills. Tapa for those of you who might not know (I didn’t), is cloth made out of the bark of the mulberry tree.  Tapa is then painted with intricate designs and used as clothing or even wall hangings in some areas.

Hina is Hawai’i’s most talented tapa maker and in high demand. Unfortuntely her husband does not help in the way he is supposed and Hina grows weary of all the demands placed on her to make tapa and provide food for her husband. Rather than live an unhappy life, she decides to search for new home to live in peace and make tapa. Most particularly because she wants to be able to do things that women are not allowed to do like eat fresh coconut, roast pork and golden ripe bananas. Eventually she climbs a moonbow to reach the moon.

I really liked this story and so did my daughter especially the illustrations by Carla Golembe. Golembe’s style of painting is one I particularly like with bold colors and striking scenes. I also liked that while Hina was not happy,  she found her own home and once again was happy. I would recommend this story to anyone who likes folktales as this one is a fascinating story one worth reading over and over again.

What some things that make you happy and or how do we determine our own happiness?

Jama Rattigan’s website and her blog jama rattigan’s alphabet soup

Carla Golembe’s website

This review is part of Cari’s Diversity Rocks! challenge

Posted in Books for Girls, Books for teaching history, Picture Books | 5 Comments »

The Orphan Singer by Emily Arnold McCully

Posted by hollybookscoops on May 13, 2009

the-orphan-singerSet in Venice in the early eighteen hundreds, this book is a piece of history reincarnated. I had no idea that Venice’s musical past had anything to do with orphaned and abandoned girls.

Enter Mama and Papa Dolci, a gifted musical couple who barely had enough food, but sang from morning to night. Their young son, Antonio was also very talented, but Mama and Papa could not afford to send him for training. He was destined to become a basket maker, instead.

When baby Nina joins the family, her parents are ‘trilled’ to hear her giggling and cooing in harmony to Antonio’s singing.  With heavy hearts, Mama and Papa decide that the ospedalo is the best hope their daughter has for training and education. So, one night, they quietly leave Nina in the infant drawer at the ospedalo.

As Catarina (Nina) grows, believing she is an orphan, the Dolci’s visit her and listen to her singing.  A wonderful performer, Caterina gains many fans, but the Dolcis are always dearest to her. One night, only Papa Dolci comes to give a last farewell to ‘Catarina’ from Antonio, who has fallen very ill. Nina sets out to rescue Antonio with the greatest power for good she has at her disposal- her angelic voice.

I really enjoyed this beautifully written and illustrated picture book, as did my children. It reminded me a bit of Cari’s time as a music major and her efforts to study Music therapy. I highly recommend this book! Cari- you should definitely check it out!

Posted in Books for teaching history, Children's Literature, Picture Books | 1 Comment »

Nonfiction Monday May 11, 2009

Posted by caribookscoops on May 11, 2009

nonfictionmondayWelcome to Nonfiction Monday! For those of you new to Nonfiction Monday, its a weekly event hosted by various blogs throughout the kidlitosphere. All you do is put a link to a nonfiction kidlit book you have read in the comments and we will update through out the day.

We are excited to be hosting this week and for today Cari reviewed Secrets of a Civil War Submarine: Solving the Mysteries of the H.L. Hunley by Sally M. Walker. A wonderful book full of adventure and intrigue about the first successful submarine attack and later the recovery of the submarine upon it’s discovery in August of 2009. Lots of appeal for science, history or math buffs! A great read for older children – I used it in my 8th grade U.S. History class. Holly reviewed My Own Two Feet by Beverly Cleary. A follow-up to A Girl From Yamhill, the first autobiography of Beverly Cleary. Both are great books for middle readers and above who identified with any of Beverly’s many lovable quirky characters- Ramona, Beezus, Henry and Ribsy, etc. I wish I’d had these books for a few English papers I had to do once upon a time.

Nonfiction Monday Links!

Cari at Bookscoops reviewed Secrets of a Civil War Submarine: Solving the Mysteries of the H.L. Hunley

Heidi Bee Roemer reviewed Wolfsnail: A Backyard Predator at the Wild About Nature blog

Lori Calabrese Writes writes a nonfiction article, “Big Jobs for Little Stamps,” in the May 2009 issue of Stories for Children Magazine

Jennifer from Little Jean Library reviewed Nic Bishop’s Forest Explorer

In Need of Chocolate reviewed  One Small Square: Seashore

Great Kid Books Celebrate! reviewed Connections Among Cultures by Jan Reynolds

Amanda at A Patchwork of Books reviewed Cycle of Rice, Cycle of Life: A Story of Sustainable Farming by Jan Reynolds

Shirley at Simple Science reviewed A Raft of Science: Puffins

Wendie Old reviewed What to Do About Alice


Roberta Gibson at Wrapped In Foil reviewed Lizards by Mark O’Shea

Book Brew reviewed Something out of Nothing: Marie Curie and Radium by Carla Killough McClafferty

Hollybookscoops reviewed My Own Two Feet by Beverly Cleary

Robin Gaphni at http://thebooknosher.blogspot.com posted Planting the Trees of Kenya.

Lynn at Infantbibliophile reviewed Uncover a Dolphin and A Kaleidopops Book: Oceans both books about dolphins.

Charlotte at Charlotte’s Library reviewed Come to the Castle!


Posted in Non-Fiction | Tagged: | 9 Comments »

Secrets of a Civil War Submarine: Solving the Mysteries of the H.L. Hunley by Sally M. Walker

Posted by caribookscoops on May 11, 2009

secretsofacivlwarsubmarine

I absolutely love this book! Imagine, a secret weapon so new and dangerous that many of the first several people who tried to use it died. Knowing this would you be willing to risk your life for such a weapon? This is what George Dixon did when he led a crew on the Civil War submarine, the H.L. Hunley a submarine of the Confederate States of America to sink a United States ship. Tragically, they never made it home and the submarine was discovered in August of 2000. Sally M. Walker painstakingly interviewed researchers, submarine veterans and combed through thousands of records in creating the book. Beautiful colored photographs and charts of the submarine help reader’s understand the text and help the reader feel like they are on board the submarine. In addition, an extensive glossary of terms and logical explanations of archeological research and its risks and rewards, help the reader learn more about this fascinating piece of history.

Walker accurately depicts the innovation and bravery of the Hunley’s makers and crew using both primary and secondary sources. This excellent book engages readers with a love of science, math, history, archeology and even modern forensics science. When I taught the Civil War I had students read a book from this era that and this was one of the few picture books I would allow my 8th graders to read – it is amazing! I highly recommend it.

What’s the scariest thing you have ever done or what would you be willing to risk your life for? For me I would definitely risk my life to save my family and I might even risk my life to teach reading – if I lived somewhere were it wasn’t allowed – like educating women in some areas of the world. It’s easy for me to say that because I am allowed to read, and teaching reading is not illegal where I live. I like to think that I that passionate about reading and promoting literacy so I hope I would.

nonfictionmondayThis review is part of Nonfiction Monday, which we are hosting! If you would like to participate click on our Nonfiction Monday Post.

Posted in Award Winning Books, Books for Boys, Books for Girls, Books for teaching history, Books for teaching Math and Science, Non-Fiction | 6 Comments »

My Own Two Feet by Beverly Cleary

Posted by hollybookscoops on May 11, 2009

I finally read the second book of Beverly Cleary’s autobiography, which covers her life after High School. The first book, A Girl from Yamhill covers the years from birth to High School Graduation. Beverly Cleary is one of my favorite authors and I was excited to read more about her life after she left home. my own two feet

Beverly’s life was filled with grueling realities during the depression. Scraping the bottom of the barrel to find enough money to attend college and then, once graduated, trying to find a job, when so few were to be had. The amount of work that she put into college and some of the ridiculous expectations were fun to learn about. In order to graduate from junior college she had to compose an original tap dance. Refusing would have cost her her diploma. Thank goodness we don’t have rules like that anymore!

Beverly is a great inspiration for the things we can accomplish when we pick a path and work hard to get across the finish line. Beverly has done so many amazing things in her life working as a librarian and in book stores and finally in creating wonderful stories that speak to the mischievous little stinkers inside each of us. I enjoyed the pictures sprinkled throughout the book. Beverly Cleary is one of my literary heroes! I highly recommend this for older (as in middle school and above) fans of Cleary’s.

Posted in Non-Fiction, Young Adult | 6 Comments »

Nonfiction Monday Here Tomorrow!

Posted by caribookscoops on May 10, 2009

nonfictionmondaySo tomorrow Holly and I will be hosting Nonfiction Monday, a weekly event in the kidlitosphere aimed at increading awareness and reading of nonfiction books. It’s simple all you need to do is drop by and leave a link to your review of a nonfiction book in the comments or Mr. Linky if one of us can figure it out and get it running for tomorrow.

Posted in News | 4 Comments »

April Review

Posted by hollybookscoops on May 10, 2009

April was a busy month for us both. Cari found and applied for a literacy specialist ‘dream’ job.  Read the May review next month to find out how it turned out.  I (Holly here) left the country for the first time ever in my life to travel to the Dominican Republic with my great husband for our 10 year anniversary. We had a great time and came back appreciating clean drinking water and missing sugary-sweet fresh pineapple. While I was out of the country my husband and I took the time to visit an orphanage, one of many in the DR, and were able to pass along a few books in Spanish as well as some basketballs, a frisbee and some really louds fu-fu toys. We hope to help with some efforts to give these wonderful kids a hand up.

Despite a wonderful week of relaxation and fun that theoretically should have carried over to make my life serene for at least two weeks after getting home, I returned to have my kids all get the stomach flu one after another for all of last week. So, now that we are back on our feet and I have a couple of nights of sleep under my belt- let’s get to the May uh, I mean April review.

Our Double Scoop this month was a great read by one of our favorite authors called  A Year Down Yonder by Richard Peck

Cari’s Pick of the Month: Hmm. . . since I only reviewed three books it should be easier right, wrong! I think I will go withFablehaven by Brandon Mull.

Holly’s pick of the month: I picked two this month Greater Than Angels by Carol Matas (this was part of my reading for National Holocaust month) and On the Wings of Heroes by Richard Peck, also a WWII story.

Books Holly reviewed:

Cari reviewed:


Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a Comment »

Dino Dung by Dr. Karen Chim and Thom Holmes, illustrated by Karen Carr

Posted by hollybookscoops on May 4, 2009

dino-dung

My sides hurt from laughing.

This book has been in our home for a couple of weeks now, due to the incessant demands of my 2 year old. On only our second trip to our new library, he demanded that we get a dinosaur book. Since they are kept on a shelf too high for him to reach, even on a stool, I had to one by one take them down for him to conduct an inspection.

“No. No. No. Not dat one, a T-Rex one. No! A T-Rex one, Mommy! A T-Rex one! No, not dat T-Rex. No. No. No . . . “

Finally, a resounding, “Yes! Dat one! Dat one T-Rex book!”

I didn’t bother to push the issue that it’s actually not a T-Rex on the cover. I just smiled and handed it over.

This was followed by twenty minutes of hugging the book while dancing around singing “Mine T-Rex book. I got mine T-rex book. Mommy! Mine T-rex book. Read it? Read it?”

“We’ll read it when we get home. Right now Mommy’s looking for books.”

Recommence dancing and singing at full volume. Thank goodness the librarian thought he was cute!

Needless to say, we were excited to get this home and read it for bedtime stories. Boy was my little guy shocked when we opened the cover and flipped to the first page, which has a picture of a collection of fossilized poop.

Gasp! Horror!

“Where’s mine T-Rex?!?!?”

Oops! That’s the trouble with picking books by the cover and not doing an inside check. Never fear! Here comes Mom with a silly explanation of dinosaur poop and the 2 year old (who is on the cusp of potty training) is immediately engrossed, or should I say grossed out and completely obsessed by the idea of Dino Poop.

“Poop Mommy? Dat poop? No way.” (giggle, giggle)

And thus began our month long obsession with the ‘poop book’. The older kids and I have actually read the information, and my two year old has listened fairly intently. But mostly he just cares about the pictures. This book contains fascinating pictures and illustrations of the inner working of dinosaurs and of fossilized feces called coprolites. Many pictures of different colors, shapes and sizes of coprolites. Even pictures of poop being cut open and ‘cooked’. At least that’s what my two year old thinks they do to it when putting it under a microscope. (I know, I know, I’ve tried explaining it, but who knew you didn’t have to wait for your kids to be teenagers before they realize you don’t know everything?) So, when we get to that page, and one somewhat similar, he announces (loud enough for Grandma to hear upstairs):

“Now, cut da poop and cook da poop!” (repeat 3 times, each time increasing in volume for authentic replication)

Now do you see why my sides hurt? Nap time begins with “Read mine poop book! Where’s da poop book? I want a read mine poop book!”

I had to break the very sad news to my toddler that we have to take the book back. We can’t keep it forever.

“Oh. Mine poop book? Take it back? Why?”

He was so crestfallen. I think this might be a good one to add to the family library. We are just about rounded out on dinosaurs after boys #1 and #2. But, I think this should complete the collection, don’t you? I mean, what else could there be to learn about dinosaurs? I think our personal library covers them from head to toe and um, maybe it should also cover the ‘crap’ they left behind. I think crap could be short for coprolites maybe that’s where the word originated. I can just see some poor person stumbling over coprolite. “Copro- what? Did you say Crapolite? Croprolite? Oh, Crap!” And a new word is born. That’s how I imagine it anyhow.

This book could really work under two categories, dinosaurs and potty training. It’s like a two for one deal. We could all use that in this day and age- we all want to get the biggest bang for our buck! And just in case you were wondering, no this book wasn’t written for toddlers, just loved to pieces by mine. There are many very interesting facts and the writing is superb. The pictures are fascinating and it is a step 5 reader book. I only wish we’d known about this book back when child #2 was full of poopy escapades . . .

Do your kids have a favorite book that took you by surprise?

Posted in Books for teaching Math and Science, Middle Readers, Picture Books, Uncategorized | 3 Comments »

 
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